True Life: I’m Addicted to Goat Cheese

There, I said it.

goatcheeseeee

I eat goat cheese everyday. Often more than once a day. I wish I could eat it all day everyday, but sadly, it is still cheese and my poor future 50-year-old-self wouldn’t appreciate that kind of artery-neglect. Says the girl who’s favorite food is french fries.

And no they don’t make “low-fat” goat cheese. Who would think of such a thing?

But when compared ounce by ounce to other cheeses, goat cheese actually reigns supreme in its nutrition stats. An ounce is typically 70-80 calories, and only 5 grams of fat, where as some of it’s competitors are over 100 calories per ounce and 10 grams of fat.

Other close seconds to goat cheese? Neufchatel, feta and part-skim fresh mozzarella.

My favorite way to eat goat cheese is on toast, topped with sliced tomatoes and cracked pepper. Plain is fine, but the other day I looked out to find my basil plant exploding on my balcony and it beckoned for me to use it in something quick and easy.

Enter: garlic basil goat cheese.

goatcheesetomato

What you’ll need to have…

  • 1 log goat cheese (4 oz)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 5-10 basil leaves (taste preference, I like it herb-y)

What you’ll need to do…

  1. Let goat cheese come to room temperature, or zap in the microwave for 15 seconds
  2. Finely chop basil and garlic
  3. Stir into goat cheese
  4. Feast

Yes it’s that easy, and yes it’s delicious. And yes this recipe should serve 3-4 people, depending on your ability to share.

Tell me, what food are you in love with right now?

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Roasted Fig Oatmeal

Since my most recent loss of routine, I’ve adapted quite a lackadaisical approach to cooking as well. By that, I don’t mean that I eat boxed macaroni and cheese everyday. No, quite the opposite actually. I’m having more fun in the kitchen.

For a while now I have had the same routine of going to Publix every weekend with my grocery list and most of my meals planned out for the week. Lots of things were on an automatic cycle as I rotated through my go-to recipes. It was just easier for me since I was so busy, and not to mention on a strict budget which I was adamant about sticking to. The budget is still intact, however I’m a little more lenient.

But now that I’m not so busy, I stopped worrying so much about planning when it came to meals. Now I’m trying to really just go with what sounds good. My favorite thing to do now is to stock up on the essentials, like eggs, basic veggies and fruit, chicken, ground turkey, oatmeal, rice, etc. and then while at the store, I stick a few fun items in my cart if they are on special. I say “fun items” because half of the time I don’t have any idea of how I’ll use them. And if you’re anywhere near as cool as I am (sarcasm, if you didn’t catch it), then you find joy in figuring it out along the way.

This past week, my favorite impulse buy was two cartons of fresh figs.

Figs – if you can get over the awkward tentacle-esque interior, they are one of the most decadent fruits you will ever eat. It’s just a bonus that they’re so high in fiber. California figs are in season from late June to September, meaning right now they are trying to get rid of all the early season crop. And wouldn’t you know it, Publix had them on sale this week.

 

Roasted fig oatmeal

figgiesWhat you’ll need to have

  • 3-4 small figs, halved
  • 1-2 tbsp honey
  • 1/2 cup old-fashioned oats, dry
  • 1 cup vanilla soymilk (or almond)
  • 1 Tbsp chia seeds
  • Hefty dash of cinnamon
  • Dash of salt
  • 1 Tbsp brown sugar

What you’ll need to do

  1. Wash figs and remove stems. Discard any that are too squishy.
  2. Cut figs in half and place cut-side-up in a glass baking dish and drizzle with honey (I just did a quick sweep across each row of figs)
  3. Bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes
  4. For oatmeal: in a small pan, combine oatmeal, soy milk, chia seeds, cinnamon and salt
  5. Bring to boil over medium heat and reduce to simmer until cooked
  6. Serve in bowl, topped with brown sugar and roasted figs

figoatsFigs will keep in an airtight container in refrigerator for 3-4 days. I actually roasted a big batch of figs the night before and topped the oatmeal with cold figs, which cooled down the hot oats nicely. And they are delish eaten straight from the container too!

 

Nutrition   |   Calories: 400   |   Fat: 7g   |   Protein: 14g   |   Fiber: 10g

 

 

What’s been your most favorite impulse purchase lately?

Mind vs. Scale

In my attempt to immerse myself into the world of eating disorders while I have the opportunity during this rotation, I am gathering as many references and resources as possible, both physically and mentally. What I mean by that is, anything that I can’t take a copy of, I spend my free-time on one of the comfy therapy couches reading through.

The great thing about this is that I’m not just flipping through textbooks. No, eating disorders are much more complex than that. Psychology comes into play, making the reading material much more enjoyable, at least in my opinion.

There are many books, self-help novels and long stories that are helpful in recovery from an eating disorder. Most of the time, these books are helpful not only to the patients, but also for the therapists, doctors and dietitians involved in recovery. It helps to understand.

So, today I picked up a book from one of the dietitian’s bookshelf and plopped down to read through a few chapters: Eat, Drink and Be Mindful, by Susan Albers.

Albers’ book is all about mindful eating. In fact, it’s woven with workbook-pages so that you can not only read the book, but become engaged and practice what you’re reading. If you’re curious about mindful eating, I suggest you read this book. It’s incredibly helpful, and if you haven’t a clue where to begin when it comes to eating mindfully, this book is for you.

But it’s not mindful eating that compelled me to write this post. No, there was a specific chapter that caught my attention. It caught my attention because, although I have a healthy relationship with food, there is one relationship that I still struggle with: the scale.

You see, I don’t quite know life without my scale. I started weighing myself in high school and really haven’t stopped ever since. Every morning, before I get into the shower, I step onto the scale. It used to be an obsessive-thing, but now it’s out of habit.

I know that it’s only habit because, back when it was an issues, the number on the scale dictated the mood for my day. Now? I take a mental note and move on. The number no longer affects my emotions.

But in Albers’ “Self Assessment” chapter, she addresses the need to not focus on specific numbers. She states that if you focus on your weight in numbers, you are less likely to focus on the behaviors that are being reflected in the weight.

She also acknowledges that there are those people that just use the scale to keep themselves accountable, being aware of what they weigh.

“These are the people who gain weight and don’t even realize it.”

I read that, and then re-read it. And then read it again. Is this like an editing error or something? I just didn’t get it.

But then I sat and thought about it, and realized that when I gain weight,  I almost always see it on the scale, and not in myself. I see the numbers creeping up day by day, and that is what tells me I’m gaining weight. But I never stop to acknowledge whether or not my body feels this way. Are my jeans tighter? Is my face fuller?

Because of my habitual morning weigh-ins, I’ve totally disconnected my mind from my body. I may have the healthiest connection between mind & food, and body & food, but what about mind and body? The connection isn’t even there anymore.

This is urging me to do two things:

1) Ditch the scale. There is absolutely no need for me to know my weight. I am worth far more than the number on the scale. The way my clothes are fitting is a better indicator of my body, and in order for me to be more connected then I need to start taking this into account.

2) Be more aware of my body during yoga. I tend to be in my mind more often when I’m doing yoga because it’s a huge way to relieve stress. But this makes yet another disconnect with my body. Yoga is all about balance, so I need to take this into practice with my focus on both mind and body.

 

Hopefully in doing this, I’ll find that connection with my body and mend the relationship.

 

Do you weigh yourself often?